The Faithful Pacesetters

Learning leadership from those who led in the Bible

Double Standards

Bible Character: James (Brother of Jesus and leader of Jerusalem council)

He is a double-minded man, unstable in all he does. James 1:8 NIV

Double minded is similar to having double standards; speaking one way…but thinking or acting in another way. In the case of the scripture James is referring to those who ask for the Lord’s forgiveness…but don’t have the real belief to receive it.

In leadership you cannot have it both ways either. It’s difficult for people to embrace the principles that are maintained by the organization, if not all are held to the same standards.

Do As I Say…Not As I Do

Why do we put clear, defined expectations on our staff, but then sometimes don’t hold ourselves to those same expectations? Obviously leadership has different responsibilities and sometimes needs certain flexibilities to perform the job, but the freedom of a leader used wrongly can quickly turn into a misuse of power.

It’s similar to having freedom in Christ; we don’t have immunity from the consequences of misusing the privilege of self-governance.

Favoritism

Here is another morale killer, the double standard of showing partiality to certain individuals. Let’s be honest…sometimes we regard certain individuals more highly than others in the workplace.

When we’re inconsistent with our expectations of certain staff members, the others will quickly notice. Treating those co-workers differently because we have a greater “like” for them will certainly have negative consequences.  The biggest complication with this practice is the decay of trust among the other staff.

Referring back to the verse in James 1, God does not place his trust in those individuals who speak one way, but think another. Consistency in the way we think, speak, and treat all staff members is a vital ingredient to positive leadership.

Advertisements

Single Post Navigation

One thought on “Double Standards

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s